microcorruption - santa cruz

This post is part of the series of solving microcorruption.com ctf challenges which continues from the previous challenge called Johannesburg. This challenge is titled Santa Cruz.

The challenge has the following description when you start:

This is Software Revision 05. We have added further mechanisms to verify that passwords which are too long will be rejected.

Maybe we are finally done with the overflow problems? This challenge took me quite a bit of time to solve thanks to the new checks that were introduced. Like, a really long time. Lets go through the process.

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microcorruption - johannesburg

This post is part of the series of solving microcorruption.com ctf challenges which continues from the previous challenge called Montevideo. This challenge is titled Johannesburg.

The challenge has the following description when you start:

This is Software Revision 04. We have improved the security of the lock by ensuring passwords that are too long will be rejected.

Alright. This might mean that we are done with the overflow challenges? Lets dive in!

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microcorruption - montevideo

This post is part of the series of solving microcorruption.com ctf challenges which continues from the previous challenge called Whitehorse. This challenge is titled Montevideo.

The challenge has the following description when you start:

This is Software Revision 03. We have received unconfirmed reports of issues with the previous series of locks. We have reimplemented much of the code according to our internal Secure Development Process.

Cool. So this one is going to be unbreakable right? Lets see!

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microcorruption - whitehorse

This post is part of the series of solving microcorruption.com ctf challenges which continues from the previous challenge called Reykjavik. This challenge is titled Whitehorse.

This challenge has the following description towards the bottom:

This is Software Revision 01. The firmware has been updated to connect with the new hardware security module. We have removed the function to unlock the door from the LockIT Pro firmware.

Not a lot of information to go on. Lets dig into the code to learn more.

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microcorruption - reykjavik

This post is part of the series of solving microcorruption.com ctf challenges which continues from the previous challenge called Cusco. This challenge is titled Reykjavik.

This challenge has the following description towards the bottom:

This is Software Revision 02. This release contains military-grade encryption so users can be confident that the passwords they enter can not be read from memory. We apologize for making it too easy for the password to be recovered on prior versions. The engineers responsible have been sacked.

Rough. But ok, time to see of its better this time. Also, “military-grade encryption”, hah! :P

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microcorruption - cusco

This post is part of the series of solving microcorruption.com ctf challenges which continues from the previous challenge called Hanoi. This challenge is titled Cusco.

If you were to read the description when you enter the challenge, one would see the following towards the bottom:

This is Software Revision 02. We have improved the security of the lock by removing a conditional flag that could accidentally get set by passwords that were too long.

Oops :P Lets take a closer look at how this fixed version works.

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microcorruption - hanoi

This post is part of the series of solving microcorruption.com ctf challenges which continues from the previous challenge called Sydney. This challenge is titled Hanoi.

If you were to read the description when you enter the challenge, one would see the following towards the bottom:

LockIT Pro Hardware Security Module 1 stores the login password, ensuring users can not access the password through other means. The LockIT Pro can send the LockIT Pro HSM-1 a password, and the HSM will return if the password is correct by setting a flag in memory.

Ok, so mention of a HSM here. Neat! Lets take a look at how that works!

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microcorruption - sydney

The next post in the series of solving the microcorruption.com ctf challenges continues from the previous challenge called New Orleans. This challenge is titled Sydney.

If you were to read the description when you enter the challenge, one would see the following right at the bottom:

This is Software Revision 02. We have received reports that the prior version of the lock was bypassable without knowing the password. We have fixed this and removed the password from memory.

Lol. Lets take a closer look.

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microcorruption - new orleans

The next post in the series of solving the microcorruption.com ctf challenges continues from the previous small tutorial challenge post. This challenge is titled New Orleans.

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microcorruption - tutorial

These posts will detail my answers to solving various microcorruption.com ctf challenges. To begin, you should have at least had a look at the lock manual for a number of helpful hints. These challenges are built to run on a MSP430 microcontroller unit, so if you need any assembly references, that is the architecture your are looking for!

Lets look at the tutorial level first.

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